Spontaneous Versus Planned Decisions

While there are certain things I like or need to include in my daily routine , I do not pre-plan my entire day. This leaves time in between to do whatever I feel needs to be done at the time. I consider myself spontaneous (impulsive doesn’t have the same fun-loving ring to it), and I’m okay with it most of the time.

Spontaneity is the reason my hair is a weird faded reddish color at the moment. I don’t really want red hair. But, a few weeks ago, I thought I did.

It’s the reason there are spray paint outlines on the floor of my garage. Because I went on a shopping spree- okay a few shopping sprees at Dollar Tree for organizational and decor items that I of course wanted to customize. Thanks, Pinterest.

Wait…what?

It’s the reason why I cut people off in conversation to interject my thoughts. (I’m really working on that one.) I sometimes even forget what I’m talking about mid-sentence. My brain jumps around pretty quickly so it loses track of what’s going on. Wait, what were we talking about?

It’s the reason why my wedding was in a small chapel in the mountains with only about ten guests in attendance. Because planning in advance isn’t really my thing. I called the chapel, and they had an opening in two weeks. Before I knew it, I told the woman I was speaking with that we would take it.

It’s the reason for most of my family’s spur of the moment day trips all over Georgia. Occasionally, I wake my family up early and let them know were heading to (insert random location that showed up on a Google search). It annoys the shit out of them at first, but I’m okay with that too. They always end up feeling grateful for the opportunity.

Should I? Should I not?

Honestly, being spontaneous has been a contributing factor in a lot of poor decisions I’ve made. On the flip side, it’s the reason that I have said yes to many amazing opportunities. It’s one of a few aspects of my personality that I have a love-hate relationship with.

So how can we differentiate between spontaneity presenting as a possible good opportunity versus a potentially bad decision? I have found that the key for me is to allow for the possibility of last minute decisions to occur but not without a quick inventory of consequences. If it’s a really important decision I use journaling to help with the decision. You can read more about that here.

If during one of these moments I were to have a sudden inclination to buy a new sofa, I would need to consider the damage this could do to my budget. That’s a pretty obvious example, but that same logic can be applied to other situations.

Point Goes To Spontaneity

When you use this concept in regards to a drive halfway across the state to hike up a mountain, the consequences could be a house full of tired, grumpy kids the next morning and calf muscles that don’t work for two days. When I compare that to the pros such as quality time with family, good exercise and sunshine, being spontaneous wins every time.

A spontaneous visit to Toccoa Falls in Toccoa , Georgia.

Do you allow yourself to have moments of spontaneity or do you prefer to plan everything in advance? I’d love to see your thoughts in the comment section below.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.